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Bird sense : what it's like to be a bird Preview this item
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Bird sense : what it's like to be a bird

Author: T R Birkhead
Publisher: New York : Walker & Company, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st U.S. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Looks at the adaptive significance of bird behavior. A lifetime spent in ornithological research and old-fashioned bird-watching has convinced the author that "we have consistently underestimated what goes on in a bird's head." He describes how using the latest available tools, neurobiologists have uncovered new aspects of bird perception--e.g., the fact that female birds that see in the ultraviolet range chose  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: T R Birkhead
ISBN: 9780802779663 0802779662 9781620401897 1620401894
OCLC Number: 759594271
Description: xxii, 265 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Seeing --
Hearing --
Touch --
Taste --
Smell --
Magnetic sense --
Emotions.
Responsibility: by Tim Birkhead.

Abstract:

Looks at the adaptive significance of bird behavior. A lifetime spent in ornithological research and old-fashioned bird-watching has convinced the author that "we have consistently underestimated what goes on in a bird's head." He describes how using the latest available tools, neurobiologists have uncovered new aspects of bird perception--e.g., the fact that female birds that see in the ultraviolet range chose mates on the basis of characteristics we can't directly perceive such as plumage markings. Even more fascinating, Birkhead explains that some birds "tend to use their right eye for close-up activities like feeding and the left eye for more distant activities such as scanning for predators." Another unexpected discovery which he hopes may prove relevant to the treatment of neuro-degenerative brain disease in humans is the plasticity of the brains of birds that live in temperate regions.
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